Isle of May 2016 – Goodbye to the Island!

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A curious weaner watches us load up the boat and leave the island

The time has come for the PHATS team to pack up and go home as almost all the grey seals have left the Isle of May and returned to sea. We have all got back to mainland safe and sound, and everyone is looking forward to some well earned rest after almost two months of fieldwork. All of our laboratory equipment and samples were packed up and shipped off the island without incident, and everything is now at our labs at Abertay University and the Sea Mammal Research Unit, ready for analysis in the new year.

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Walking down to meet the boat at sunrise, ready to leave the island yesterday morning

There were only nine of our study weaners still on the island during our last survey, and the majority of them are on the edges of the colony ready to go to sea. Oscar is still hanging out in his pool off the south end of the island, and Papa and X-ray have both made it to the bottom of the southern cliffs and are playing and dozing with a bunch of other weaners there. Hopefully they will all find their way out to sea and learn to forage and catch fish in the coming months. Even if they do survive their risky first year, it’s sadly unlikely that we’ll see them anytime soon on the island again. Grey seals usually don’t come back to breed for at least five years if they are female and even longer if they are male. If they do return to the colony however, we’ll be able to identify them from the number on their orange flipper tags, and if you see any seals with tags please do let us know so we can work out which of our study animals you saw.

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Papa (right foreground) with a gang of other weaners, ready to go to sea at the base of the south cliffs on the Isle of May

These kind of mark-recapture methods are used in all sorts of studies on many different animal species, which I was reminded of during the last weaner survey before we left. While searching the southern cliffs I came across a shag with a ring on its leg, which marks it as one of the study individuals the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology has captured, ringed and released back into the wild to help collect data on seabird population dynamics and behaviour. If you see a ringed shag (the leg rings can be several different colours, not just yellow with black writing like the one I saw below) please email the sighting information to shags@ceh.ac.uk and if you are interested in the project’s work then you can keep track of what is happening through their twitter feed @CEHseabirds. This particular bird was ringed as a chick in 2000 on the Isle of May, which makes her 16 years old and she has raised 26 chicks so far in her life (information courtesy of the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology).

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The shag I saw on the southern cliffs of the Isle of May, with ‘DDJ’ on her coloured leg band

The PHATS team will be back out in the field in January 2017, when we will return to the Isle of May to look for moulting grey seals. The majority of individuals will enter the moult later in the year at around March/April time, but there are always some seals that start early. We will resume blog updates then, so in the meantime we all wish you Merry Christmas, a Happy New Year and hopefully see you in 2017!

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Goodbye for now… grey seals hauled out on the north eastern shore of the island, with the Low Light, the Beacon and the Main Light above them.

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