Liege 2017 – A brief introduction to blubber tissue

Minced blubber biopsies in cells ready to be capped and put through accelerated solvent extraction, to obtain all the lipids from a samples for further analysis.
Weighing a ASE vial after ASE is finished and the solvent has been evapourated off to calculate lipid mass in the sample. This is from one of Foxtrot’s biopsies from last year, and it had 0.42g of lipid in it, meaning 80% of the original biopsy was fat.

Well my first week at the University of Liege working with CART has flown by, and I’ve been working on the blubber biopsies we collected from the grey seals last year on the Isle of May. All the lipids (fats) need to be extracted from the blubber tissue before we can move forward with the pollutant analysis, so all the samples must be carefully prepared and put through Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE). This process uses high pressure and temperature conditions plus chemicals called solvents (like hexane and acetone) to remove all the lipids from the sample in the cells. This process gives us a completely liquid solution of lipids and solvents at the end of it, and we can then evaporate the solvent to leave just the lipids from our sample. This step is important as it gives the lipid mass of our sample, and allows us to work out how many nanograms of pollutant per gram of lipid in our sample there is (ng/g) . While ASE of our samples is an important step in the lab work, there isn’t really much more to say about it so I’m going to use the rest of the blog this week to give a brief introduction to blubber tissue, a crucial part of the anatomy of all marine mammal species worldwide.

Blubber tissue enables marine mammals to endure cold aquatic environments, like this Orca family living off the coast of Iceland.

All marine mammals, from the largest whale to the smallest seal, have a layer of fat underneath their skin called blubber. This layer of fat is extremely important for the survival of marine mammals for two reasons:

  1. It enables them to keep warm (thermoregulate) in freezing oceans.
  2. It provides a store of energy for individuals to utilise when they are not feeding, which happens in many marine mammal species at various points throughout their lives due to breeding or moulting.
A blubber biopsy from one of our seals. Blubber samples for pollutant analysis must be stored in glass or wrapped in foil to prevent loss of pollutants from the sample to any plastic they come into contact with.

Fat tissue deposits in all animal species perform these same two functions, however other species frequently have additional ways to thermoregulate (such as fur in land mammals) or do not endure long periods of fasting repeatedly while migrating or breeding as many marine mammals do. The importance of this tissue has lead to substantial blubber thickness evolving in marine mammals, and a stratified structure throughout the depth of the tissue is present so that it can perform both functions at the same time. Typically, blubber tissue can be roughly divided into three sections as you go from the part closest to the skin (the outer blubber) to the part closest to the inside of the seal (the inner blubber). The inner blubber is the most metabolically active, and this is where lipids are mobilised to provide energy for an individual when it either cannot find food or is purposefully fasting. The mid blubber is the most variable in thickness across individual marine mammals, and in thin individuals can be completely absent. It is thought it acts as a more long term storage tissue, and that its thickness is influenced by seasonal food availability. The outer blubber is typically of stable thickness within a species regardless of the nutritional state of an individual, and is thought to be primarily for thermoregulation. Hence even starving individuals will always have some blubber tissue to keep them from freezing, as the outer blubber is not mobilised as an energetic resource.

Blubber is a fascinating tissue to study and several different approaches can be used to analyse it in many contexts, like this recent study by one of my friends, Joanna Kershaw, who measured the hormone cortisol in blubber from porpoises to validate it’s use as a biomarker of body condition. The PHATS project I work on uses both established techniques (investigating pollutant concentrations) and novel protocols (the explant approach for tissue culture experiments that our team leader pioneered in seals) to make the most of the blubber samples we collect from our study animals to explore the prevalence of persistent organic pollutants in the marine environment and it’s impact on energy balance in seals.

A particulary tubby looking Charlie from last year’s study group on the Isle of May. Her fat reserves in her blubber layer will help her survive the tough first year at sea she faces when leaving the breeding colony.

MEANWHILE I am settling back into Liege life quite happily outside of the lab. I am not staying in the university accomodation this year, and have a lovely little flat not far from the campus to retreat to. In my time away from the lab I’m trying to keep up with the usual paper and grant writting that all resarchers need to keep on top of, plus greatly enjoying bebing reunited with the amazing macaroons they make here! Seriously, why can’t they be this good in Scotland…

Happiness is macaroons =D

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