New Publication – An explant approach to studying fat tissue function in wild animals

Adult male grey seal hauled out on a rocky seashore. Even in wild conditions, the PHATS team is bringing cell culture into the field!

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Behaviour 2017’s fantastic closing dinner party, complete with a live band featuring 6 ukuleles!

I have now returned from an incredibly successful week at Behaviour 2017 (link), and what a spectacular conference it was! The sheer variety of science that people were talking about was incredible and inspiring, plus I got a great response to both my symposium talk on seal oxytocin and the poster I presented on aggression. I meet so many wonderful people, heard lots of interesting talks and I even managed to avoid getting roasted in the blazing Portuguese sun! I had never previously been to a behaviour conference of any kind, but this one has really encouraged me to keep an eye out for future ASAB meetings to present at. Huge thanks to the lovely people working as part of the SoHaPi research group for inviting me to speak at your symposium, I look forward to meeting up with you all in the future!

Taking the stage at Behaviour 2017 to talk about my work on oxytocin in wild seals

More good news was waiting for me when I arrived home from Portugal; our PHATS team leader, Dr Kimberley Bennett, let us know that the first paper the PHATS team have worked on was coming out at last! This paper details our work investigating whether an explant approach (basically blobs of many living cells) would work for culturing fat (or adipose) cells collected from wild animal species in field conditions. Additionally, we wanted to know whether we could manipulate the explants during culture to

100mg explants of adipose tissue weighed out and ready for transfer to culture plates for their 24 hour exposures to different treatments on the Isle of May, Scotland.

uncover the physiological consequences of changes in the nutrients or hormones the cells have access to. We found we could not only keep our cells alive once collected from wild seals on the coast of Scotland, but once transported back to the lab we could culture the cell explants for at least 24 hours. During this time we could expose the adipose cells to different treatments, such as high glucose concentrations in the cell culture media (the sugary, salty goo that cells are suspended in during culture to keep them alive) or difference hormone additions, such as hydrocortisone. We found significant differences in the metabolic profiles of adipose cells given different treatments, demonstrating this technique could be used to test the responses of wild animal tissue to a variety of substrates an individual may physiologically generate, or be exposed to.

Studying wildlife physiology is always challenging because collecting samples is tricky, typically giving small samples sizes in less than ideal conditions for complex labwork. However our work to bring cell culture techniques to the wild regions of Scotland shows that even difficult processes like cell culture, which require sterile conditions, aseptic technique and specialised equipment, are possible with thought and preparation beforehand. Studying cell function in wild animals is important as how different tissues function in response to different environmental challenges will impact on how individuals survive. Fat tissue is especially crucial for survival as it represents the energy stores animals have to rely on when conditions are tough, and also helps keep individuals warm in cold environments. By understanding how fat tissue functions, we can better understand why different species in changing environments can either adapt to meet new energetic challenges or be overwhelmed by them.

Even in muddy, windy or wet conditions, cell culture experiments can be possible if you are careful! (grey seal mothers and pups on the Isle of May, Scotland)

Speaking of ‘the wild regions of Scotland’, it’s that time of year when I start prepping all the field equipment for the PHATS team’s annual research trip to the Isle of May grey seal breeding colony, off the east coast of Scotland. Join us here for our fieldwork blog, bringing you all the adventures we have running a tissue culture lab on an island full of seals. We are scheduled to leave in late October, and will stay on the island studying the seals for about 2 months, heading home just in time for Christmas (hopefully!). I’ve also got two more conferences to attend before I go off into the field, one in September in Nottingham, UK with the British Society for Neuroendocrinology and one in October in Halifax, Canada with the Society for Marine Mammalogy. If you are going to either and want to say hello I look forward to meeting you there!

Weaned grey seal pups occupying the path down to Kirkhaven harbour on the Isle of May, Scotland